Safety and Security Window Film Explained

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Safety and Security Window Film is primarily a clear un-tinted film that is designed to hold shards of glass in place when under impact, although some films are available combined with a tinted solar coating.  The film is designed to hold the harmful shards of glass in place when a window is broken under impact; it’s these shards that cause injury and even death in some cases.  Safety and Security window film is not used to stop the glass from breaking but rather hold the shards in place protecting the occupants. The film is available in various thicknesses each offering increased protection.  The film is made up in the same way as most window films except that the end result is a thicker film.  They are usually either 2-ply or 3-ply.  2-ply uses two sheets of polyester with an adhesive and backing liner on one side and a scratch resistant coating on the other.  3-ply has the same makeup except there are three sheets of polyester.

The history of safety and security window film

A standard safety and security film is 4 mil thick, this is not mm, mil refers to thousandths of an inch.  4 mil is 4/1000th” or 100 microns.  This 4 mil film is first and foremost a safety film.  The film was, and still is, used to bring glazing up to the same standard as safety glass.  In 1992 a new Health and Safety Regulation came into effect which meant a lot of the glass in public and commercial areas needed to be replaced with safety glass, this would have been a massive cost to many businesses and public sectors if not for safety film.  Instead of replacing the glazing this safety film was fitted which gave exactly the same effect at a fraction of the cost.

Safety Film for Security

Now a day’s safety film is still installed to bring substandard glass to the correct standard but it is also fitted to make a property more secure.  When installed on glass that is already laminated or toughened the film gives great protection against vandals or burglars trying to gain access to the property.

Extreme Security Window Film

Extreme security window film is 7 mil (7/1000th”) or 175 microns thick.  The film is actually a bomb blast protection film and is often used for areas that could be affected by the ricochet caused by an explosion.  This film is nearly twice as thick as a standard safety and security window film giving twice the protection. This film is ideal if the glazing is already quite weak or if you are in an area where a wannabe burglar may have a little longer to gain access to the property.  Most burglars are opportunists and if they are unable to get into the property easily will make haste and attempt somewhere else after making a noise without success.

Bomb Blast Protection Window Film

As well as the 7 mil film mentioned in the previous paragraph which gives protection against the aftershock of an explosion there is a 12 mil (12/1000th”) or 300-micron film which offers extreme protection.  This anti blast window film is designed to take an impact from a bomb blast, although this depends on many factors which should be discussed with a specialist such as the type of glass, frames, anchor system (such as dow corning).  When fitted correctly this film will actually hold the glass in place when under impact from a bomb.  As such some people also use this as an extreme security film instead of or as well as security shutters.

Evowrap install anti shatter window films throughout the UK.  Our friendly staff are here to help.  We have years of experience and provide extensive warranties on every installation.

2 Responses

  1. Hi
    What is your best or thickest window film for noise blocking please. It is for an glass office partition in London.
    The partition could be filmed on both sides and each side is around 10 metres square, actual glass. Each 3700 long x 2600 high
    If you have a budget cost for supply and fitting, that would be good.

    1. The thickest film we have is our blast protection film. It’s not really designed for noise blocking though. Its made to help protect occupants by stopping the glass from shattering if there’s an explosion. It could potentially reduce noise through the glass but unfortunately, I have no idea how much (if any).

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